Bridge Farm 2013 Report

Bridge Farm 2013 Report

Non-Technical Summary

This report presents an assessment of the archaeological investigations undertaken at Bridge Farm, which
consisted of four evaluation trenches measuring 20m x 10m, 20m x 15m, 20m x 25m and 25m x 10m (Figure
1). The trenches were located across two fields, House Field which is arable land and Little Park Brook
which is a grassland meadow (Figure 2). This report summarises the stratigraphical sequence of
archaeological remains and describes the work undertaken on the archive. The principal objective of this
report is to refine the research objectives of the project in light of the findings and assess the potential of the
archive to address these research objectives.
In 2011 a geophysical survey was carried out at Bridge Farm by David Staveley and members of the Culver
Archaeological Project (Figure 3). The survey indicated a possible settlement and the field walking and metal
detecting survey carried out in December 2012 pointed towards Roman occupation. Therefore, between 1st
July 2013 and 10th August 2013 an archaeological evaluation was carried out by Culver Archaeological
Project and AOC Archaeology at the site of Bridge Farm funded by The Heritage Lottery Fund.
The evaluation revealed nine phases of activity from the prehistoric period through to 1st to 4th century.
Roman activity continuing into the post medieval period. The Roman period can be split into four individual
phases c.AD.43-70, c.AD.70-150, c.AD.150-250 and c.AD250-400+. All in situ remains recorded within the
trenches were dated to the Roman period, which consisted of roadside ditches, linear ditches, gullies, post
holes, a possible clamp tile kiln with later reuse and a tile lined pit.
Trench 1 consisted of 11 features, a roadside ditch, six pits, and four postholes, which were cut into two of
the pits. The two large pits in the centre of the trench and one at the eastern end of the trench have
truncated earlier features. All features date to 1st & 2nd century.
Trench 2 consisted of six features, an overburden layer, two roadside ditches, two enclosure ditches, and a
small pit on the southern edge of the outer enclosure ditch. The overburden layer dates mid-3rd-4th c. The
two roadside ditches running on an N-S axis lower fills date to 1st-2nd century. The enclosure ditches date to
3rd -4th century. The small pit had no datable pottery, although it was filled with imbrex, floor tile, tegulae and
box flue tile.
Trench 3 consisted of 16 features, two roadside ditches, a metalled road surface, two flint packed postholes,
a small hut consisting of postholes and shallow gullies, an ash pit, six postholes, a possible tile kiln which
has been reused, a gulley running SE from the possible kiln, and a tile lined pit. All features date 1st-4th
century.
Trench 4 consisted of five features, two enclosure ditches, a small pit, one roadside ditch running on an N-S
axis, one cremation burial (c200-300AD). All features date from 2nd-4th century.
Generally, the archaeological features uncovered tallied with the results of the geophysical survey. There
was a medium density of archaeological features over the four evaluation trenches. The overall results have
been very successful and the research questions set out in our project design have been fully achieved.

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